“Wait, What’s A ‘Vine’?”

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  On January 24, 2013 a new system of social networking was release: Vine. This program has risen to the point where it is being used more, and more frequently than YouTube is today.  Unfortunately the term “Vine” has not been made relatively common knowledge.

    A Vine is simply a simply a copyrighted, six second long video. The feature or ability of vines is the way in which they are recorded. Instead of having to press pause button over and over, a vine takes advantage of this by requiring contact upon the smart phone’s screen to record.   This feature allows most amateur recordings to have a taste of special effects.  This ability requires recording on a smart phone.

   The format of this application is available for most smart phones, and follows a similar system to Twitter in the system of following popular creators. Vine is in direct correlation with the already established social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Vine connects people to their already existing Facebook and/or Twitter accounts, but the user interface of Vine involves following the activity of other users and vice versa. If a user is following someone on Vine and they create a video, this activity will be notified.

   Due to the exponential growth of Vine’s popularity and amount of users, Instagram, a competing application, was driven to initiate a counterattack to its interface. Instagram added the ability to record videos in the exact same manner of Vine. Now the two applications are grouped together with this ability.

   This new manner of recording videos requires users to be able to grip the viewer’s enjoyment or interest in a mere six seconds. This has caused a change in how humorous videos are written. Comedians such as Bo Burnham or Kevin Hart have gained renown via Vine. If a Vine is popular enough, it is directly connected to a virtual highway of viewers.

   Vine has grown to be a leader in the modern amateur short film recording industry. The next question is what will surpass this leading program?

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